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Advice on selecting a text

Martin

Posted 25 June 2004 - 10:09 AM

QUOTE (Lindsay @ Jun 25 2004, 08:57 AM)
I didn't know you could do poetry for your personal study. We were just told to do a book.

did you do it last year?

lorna_04

Posted 25 June 2004 - 02:04 PM

I did "about a boy" by Nick Hornby. For your synopsis you could argue how both characters are children. The alternative narration is another useful technique which you could discuss.

Good luck whatever you choose!!

Shaun

Posted 25 June 2004 - 04:01 PM

I studied "Animal Farm" by George Orwell. It has a clear message, lots of symbolism and isn't too long.

"All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others."

linds

Posted 25 June 2004 - 06:24 PM

QUOTE (Martin @ Jun 25 2004, 10:09 AM)
QUOTE (Lindsay @ Jun 25 2004, 08:57 AM)
I didn't know you could do poetry for your personal study.  We were just told to do a book.

did you do it last year?

Did I do Higher English last year? Yeah.

little_minx

Posted 26 June 2004 - 12:36 PM

QUOTE (Martin @ Jun 24 2004, 05:16 AM)
again, i have to say - do poetry for your personal study. it's less to look at so it is more managable.

trust me. poetry!

We were strongly advised to stay away from poetry. We were prety much told to do drama or prose (but preferebly prose).

james1

Posted 26 June 2004 - 01:16 PM

don't just approach it as NAB assessment as you can use the text(s) in paper II of the exam

choose carefully

my advise is choose a book, possibly drama but avoid poetry

Martin

Posted 27 June 2004 - 02:59 PM

Well,

Despite people saying avoid poetry - I still strongly suggest doing it.

kaykay

Posted 13 August 2004 - 12:15 PM

I did Great Expectations, although I never actually finished the book. My sole criteria for choosing it was that comprehensive notes on the text were available on the internet. I worked from these and passed first time smile.gif

On the last day of 5th year my class nominated me to say a few words of thanks to the teacher, I ended my erm... "heartfelt sppech" with the confession that I hadn't finished the text....

She burst out laughing, announcing that "That was blatantly obvious from the beginning...."

Got an A tho smile.gif

natalie1062

Posted 31 August 2004 - 07:17 PM

I did Memoirs of a Geisha last year and really enjoyed it, there is so much to write about and I would really encourage people to read it. Really great book.

Paul

Posted 31 August 2004 - 09:20 PM

I did Espedair Street by Iain Banks....superb! The only book I have ever been able to finish.

Its bout a paisley rockband from the day they get together till the day they split and till one member dies, from goin to pub to goin to borin uni lectures to gettin chased through Ferguslie Park

You should all read it, even if u arent doin a personal study...worth a look!

Shandogg

Acaila

Posted 01 September 2004 - 02:26 PM

I personally did Les Miserables by Victor Hugo, but I that was a very personal choice. Don’t go for that, even if it’s just because you’d have to lug it in to school every day.
Other people in my class did the following and passed unless otherwise stated
Frankenstein
To Kill A Mockingbird
1984
Tom Sawyer (not a good choice supposedly, failed first time)
The 39 Steps (failed first time)
Pride and Prejudice
The Outsider
The Bell Jar
The Colour Purple
The Beach
Sunset Song
Empire of the Sun
Jane Eyre
The Woman Who Walked Into Doors
I’ve forgotten quite a few but I’ll add some more if I can think of them.
Classic literature is good, but make sure it’s something you’d actually enjoy. A short book like 1984 shouldn’t be too bad.
I agree with whoever recommended doing something the teacher hadn’t read. I always said if I forgot my quotes, I’d just quote from the musical of Les Miserables and the teacher wouldn’t know the difference (Didn’t need to in the end thankfully).


Discogirl17

Posted 02 September 2004 - 11:47 AM

Yes the Colour purple is a good book to do and it has a movie and most teachers havent read the book, however I belive the movie is quite seperate from the book and really u do need to know ur stuff.
If ur looking for one a teacher hasnt read then dont do Empire of the Sun, this also has a film (by Steven Speilberg) but details in the film are again different from the book as is some of the language used. The Bell Jar is a great one to do and is by a truely great writer.

As some general advice dont bank on films of books, do read the book and do quote from it as the films can often be much different to the books.

werlop

Posted 02 September 2004 - 04:12 PM

Although I didn't do this book for my personal study, the novel"A Time To Kill" user posted image by John Grisham

It is an excellent book and there is loads to talk about.

There is also a film, but this deviates from the novel to some extent although not as far as other movie productions of novels.

Vazza

Posted 02 September 2004 - 08:01 PM

I choose to do The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux and looked at how I had saw as a love story not horror and about the gothic aspects of it.
Others in my class(es) did:
  • Lord of the Rings blink.gif
  • Man and Boy by Nick Hornby Many Nick Hornby books
  • The Bell Jar
  • I know why the caged bird sings
  • The Wasp Factory

Someone also took to similar short stories and look at how they dealt with the subject (can't remember what the theme/subject was)


memz_88

Posted 03 September 2004 - 05:53 PM

Ive chosen to do 1984 for my personal study but I haven't got a clue what to have as my 'workin title'! To be honest I don't know what it all means!! unsure.gif

Any ideas or any good material on 1984????

I REALLY NEED HELP BEFOR NEXT TUESDAY!!! unsure.gif

werlop

Posted 03 September 2004 - 08:56 PM

I love 1984, it is such a good book to write about, if ever so slightly clichéd.

There are very good notes at Spark Notes.

What to write about? You could write about the ruling party's ability to control the population through their adulteration of the language - if there are no words to describe a rebelious action, how can you rebel?

You could compare the book to current society and see if you find any parallels (you will).

You could talk about a key scene - room 101 - where your worst fears are presented infront of you.

I havn't got time to go into detail just now, but there is soo much to write about for this book, if you need any help with it write me a message. I wrote about this book in the exam and got an A.

George

Posted 03 September 2004 - 11:27 PM

QUOTE(memz_88 @ Sep 3 2004, 06:53 PM)
Any ideas or any good material on 1984????

View Post


My Specialist Study was on Nineteen Eighty-Four; it was An examination of how Orwell creates a dystopian society in order to warn against totalitarianism, both in his time and today.

I looked at:
  • the context in which Orwell wrote the novel; at the beginning of what became the Cold War.
  • the depiction of dereliction/decay, showing the Party's main concern is control over its people
  • the physical control of the Party; eg lack of food, the "Physical Jerks", and Room 101
  • psychological control, notably the use of telescreens to monitor people, or at least to appear to. Like the Victorian design of the Panopticon, it's impossible to watch everyone all the time, but the prisoners behave as though they are always being watched
  • the destruction of family. As a competing "institution", totalitarian governments see it as a threat. The Parsons family clearly shows this, with the children spying on their parents
  • the isolation brought about under totalitarianism - "There will be no love, except the love of Big Brother"
  • finally, the way the Party rewrites history; this is in fact Winston's job
I hope that helps, but obviously it's a personal point of view. That was the aspect that most interested me, and they were just some of the thoughts I had.

I also referred to the SparkNotes, and ClassicNotes. I would also recommend the Reader's Guide compiled by Daniel Lea. It covers Animal Farm too, and there's lots of good critical thinking in there. The story about the woman dying as a result of watching the 50s TV adaptation is also interesting!

memz_88

Posted 04 September 2004 - 12:18 PM

Thanks for the ideas! They've been a gr8 help!! biggrin.gif

Icemaiden

Posted 06 September 2004 - 06:17 PM

I did 'Chocolat' by Joanne Harris last year for my spec. study and I think I did something like showing how the conflict proceeds or something.I passed first time too.This year I'm doing 'The lovely bones' by Alice Sebold. Both books were/are for higher.

The wasp factory - Iain Banks is a good one to do too.

Ice Maiden

superstar

Posted 07 September 2004 - 08:20 PM

QUOTE(Icemaiden @ Sep 6 2004, 07:17 PM)
This year I'm doing 'The lovely bones' by Alice Sebold.

View Post



That is a really good book i read it over the summer! biggrin.gif


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