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Follow-up Writing Passages

ScotlandGirl

Posted 07 May 2006 - 04:58 PM

Just wondering how many passages/paragraphs/whatever everyone has to learn for the follow-up writing after the listening exam?

We literally have about 30 different passages to learn, some are over 60 words, and it's driving me insane! I think I'm going to end up making up have of my writing because I don't have enough time to learn everything!

I'll be fine if the topic is something like 'friends' but if it's 'do you like wearing a school uniform' or something then that's not quite so easy..!

dehny

Posted 08 May 2006 - 06:18 PM

Ich verstehe nicht.

never heard of anyone preparing actual paragraphs for the exam,

its meant to be done on the hop

ScotlandGirl

Posted 09 May 2006 - 06:50 PM

Really?!?! But how on earth are you meant to know how to answer questions like 'Which is better - holidays with friends or with family?' without having at least considered your answer beforehand?! You wouldn't know what to say!

xpurple_starsx

Posted 09 May 2006 - 07:45 PM

I did Higher French last year and I think it has the same format with the short essay at the end of the listening paper. We did maybe 5 or 6 paragraphs so when it came for studying for this part of the exam I had to just make sure I had learnt the vocab from the different topics. Usually they aren't too obscure and the same ones repeat over and over so that helped. Don't stress out trying to learn 30 passages.

Make sure you have some linking words and opinion phrases. It's a good idea to learn some of the phrases from the essays and the vocab will no doubt be useful. Know how to form different tenses too. Also, if you just write down a passage you've memorised there's a good chance the examiner will spot that and deduct marks. Even if you do go down the learning the paragraphs route, just make sure your answer actually fits the question, don't try and twist it! Take 5 mins to think about the question and scribble your thoughts down. If you know the German for something that fits the qu but it isn't your opinion put it in anyway, they're assessing your language skills, they don't care if it's what you really think. Don't worry about not knowing what to write, it will come to you once you start.

And use the dictionary in a sensible way. be grateful you still get one (French is one of my subjects at uni and we get no dictionary for any of the exams!).


Good luck!

dehny

Posted 09 May 2006 - 07:53 PM

QUOTE(ScotlandGirl @ May 9 2006, 07:50 PM) View Post

Really?!?! But how on earth are you meant to know how to answer questions like 'Which is better - holidays with friends or with family?' without having at least considered your answer beforehand?! You wouldn't know what to say!



simply by thinking for three seconds about the answer in English and then write it in German huh.gif how else lol

ScotlandGirl

Posted 10 May 2006 - 07:17 PM

QUOTE(xpurple_starsx @ May 9 2006, 08:45 PM) View Post

Also, if you just write down a passage you've memorised there's a good chance the examiner will spot that and deduct marks.


Fair enough but that's what the people in Higher German did last year, and out of the 9 candidates there were 8 As and 1 B!

Thank you for your advice though, it was helpful - a lot of my passages overlap each other anyway so I can probably cut down the numbers and ad lib some of it. I would feel too scared going into the exam not having learnt anything though!

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