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C.S. Help

Rocky

Posted 08 December 2005 - 05:10 PM

I can't belive I can't get the answer to these Q, can someone help me.

1- What service do the registers in the CPU provide for the ALU?

2- What is ASCII code used to represent?

Dave

Posted 08 December 2005 - 07:15 PM

1) Registers hold data to perform the logical and arithmatic calculations as processing is done

2) This has to be SG so here is a hint its used to represent data. A device which is related to ASCII is used to use this site

Richard_05

Posted 08 December 2005 - 08:14 PM

QUOTE
- What is ASCII code used to represent?


Thats higher? blink.gif laugh.gif

coca

Posted 08 December 2005 - 10:17 PM

1: As Dave said, registers provide the ALU with very high speed memory locations to store/read numbers, on 32-bit chips each register is 32 bits wide.

2: Characters. That includes all the English alphabet, plus some symbols, and some control characters - ones you can't see like the return code (\r) or the newline code (\n) or the bell code (\a (to make the computer beep!)). It's not used much now because it doesn't provide an acceptable amount of characters, so it's been extended by ISO-8859 and Unicode. ASCII maps directly onto both of these character sets to provide compatibility.

Rocky

Posted 09 December 2005 - 02:37 PM

Is address bus a 1-way bus, or is that wrong?

Dave

Posted 09 December 2005 - 03:36 PM

yes it is one way

Rocky

Posted 09 December 2005 - 08:37 PM

Listen, see the connection between a computer's word length and the speed of the fetch-execute cycle. How does it work?

coca

Posted 10 December 2005 - 12:12 AM

The width of the data bus, or "word size", influences the speed of the F-X-C in that the amount of data collected per memory-read is equal to the word size. The wider the bus, the faster the cycle is. For example, if I wanted to fetch 64 bits of data from memory with my Pentium 4, it would take one read. On an Intel 8088 it would take 8 reads, because the word size of the chip is 8 bits.

ermd

Posted 12 December 2005 - 10:18 AM

QUOTE(pseudotoxic @ Dec 10 2005, 12:12 AM)
For example, if I wanted to fetch 64 bits of data from memory with my Pentium 4, it would take one read.

View Post


Only if your OS is 64-bit compatible tongue.gif.

coca

Posted 12 December 2005 - 07:40 PM

Lies, it's still a 32-bit chip!

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