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#70654 strathclyde offers

Posted by Bridget on 27 February 2006 - 10:27 PM in Course Choices

QUOTE(Pringles @ Feb 27 2006, 03:03 PM)
Is there anyone applying to Strathclyde, to do Chemical engineering

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I'm a direct entrant 2nd year chemical engineer. If you've got any questions I'll try to answer them.. if I can tongue.gif



#70198 Conditional/Unconditional Offers From Uni...

Posted by Bridget on 23 February 2006 - 08:02 PM in Course Choices

QUOTE(Vixus @ Feb 23 2006, 06:46 PM)
Unconditional from St Andrews and Edinburgh!! But tell you what. I'm still going to work hard and get the best grades I can because it means I have a better chance at a scholarship and direct-entry.

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I'm a direct entrant... don't go there, lol - take a nice easy year instead!
No, seriously, it's hard work but I've found it okay (so far!) and hopefully it will pay off in the end - graduating with honours at 20 will be to your advantage tongue.gif (especially if you want to do a postgraduate qualification)



#62862 Oxford Maths Test

Posted by Bridget on 29 November 2005 - 12:11 AM in Course Choices

QUOTE(Bridget @ Nov 24 2005, 07:09 PM)
although the specimen paper looks fairly easy the actual exam is almost impossible

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Wait until you see the real thing before saying it's easier than it looks tongue.gif !



#62652 Oxford Maths Test

Posted by Bridget on 25 November 2005 - 09:56 PM in Course Choices

It depends on lots of factors. However, remember that last year, Oxford's total intake of scottish students dropped from around 7% to about 1.2% ohmy.gif Even then, the majority of those applicants came from the best schools in Scotland...



#62557 Oxford Maths Test

Posted by Bridget on 24 November 2005 - 06:09 PM in Course Choices

I wouldn't be fooled by the Oxford maths exam called "Mathematics for Physicists" - although the specimen paper looks fairly easy the actual exam is almost impossible (sorry!). I sat it last year and it asked the most obscure questions possible... the majority of which were not covered in the AH syllabus. Then you'll have at least 2 interviews - one involves the usual "Why did you choose Oxford?" type questions and a couple of questions on topics you've covered recently in maths and physics at school. The second will be mainly deriving formula (some things you won't have seen before) on a white-board for the interviewer which was easier.
Good Luck ! smile.gif



#57019 I wanna be an astronaut!

Posted by Bridget on 09 October 2005 - 11:29 AM in General Chat

QUOTE(Wedge37 @ Oct 9 2005, 12:08 PM)
Yup, so this thread is basically about what you wanted to be as an adult, when you were six years old or whatever, and does it have any bearing toward what you want to do now? For example, I wanted to be an astronaut when I was six years old, now I'm studying for a MEng in chemical engineering. Nothing to do with being an astronaut. tongue.gif

So, go on! Tell us all about it! smile.gif

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QUOTE(Wedge37 @ Oct 9 2005, 12:08 PM)
I wanted to be an astronaut when I was six years old, now I'm studying for a MEng in chemical engineering. Nothing to do with being an astronaut. tongue.gif

So, go on! Tell us all about it! smile.gif

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That's not completely true, a notable number of chemical engineers have become astronauts; Dr. Mae C. Jemison, Al Sacco Jr, Leroy Chiao.. to name a few. So it's not that far removed from your childhood dream tongue.gif




#52724 "pharmacy: registered:"

Posted by Bridget on 04 September 2005 - 05:35 PM in Course Choices

I doubt there would be a place for the MPharm (the course required by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain for entry to the postgraduate course which will allow you to become fully registered) course on clearing as entry is very competitive. unsure.gif According to the prospectus anyway...

http://www.strath.ac.uk/prospectus/pdf/2006/ug/Science.pdf



#52518 Plans for uni next year

Posted by Bridget on 01 September 2005 - 10:31 PM in After School

This is the reply I sent someone else asking a similar question in a previous post (hope it helps smile.gif );

Hi, I'm just starting a degree in chemical engineering.
The course is mainly a combination of maths, chemistry and physics - although more recently it involves concepts found in biology and medicine (i.e. biotechnology, designing artificial organs/ skin cells/ etc).
It's actually quite a broad degree at university in terms of what you will study. Most chemical engineering students, on top of a heavily scientific/engineering course content, must also takes courses in management, computing, economics, possibly European law/ social policy etc. which are essential for roles within the chemical industry (this is because chemical engineers frequently reach management positions). Infact, in some universities, languages can also be taken which provide the chance to spend 6 months or a year abroad, carrying out research or studying at a non-English speaking university.
There are two different classifications of degree offered to chemical engineering students, the BEng and the MEng. The Meng will immediately allow you to enter into a graduate industrial position where as the Beng will only allow you to qualify once you have completed a further course via an industrial placement. If you are doing a master of engineering as an undergraduate degree, you will have to complete a research project in your 5th year (either in an industrial or university environment) Direct entry (going directly into 2nd year) to either of these degrees is usually offered by most universities providing you gain ~AAB in appropriate AHs. Often, large blue-chip companies will offer scholarships/ paid summer placements to well qualified students - but usually for students in year 2 of their degree. This can be found out through your university department.
The average age of becoming a chartered chemical engineer is 27, and this will allow you to apply for more senior positions and gain a considerable rise in your salary. Not only will a degree in chemical engineering allow you to become a chemical engineer, but also (because of its mathematical content) it will allow you to work in investment banking, accounting, finance, etc and if further training is taking, patent law, business. I’ve heard of some chemical engineers pursuing a career in medicine after gaining a degree in the subject. On a stranger note, a notable number of chemical engineers have become astronauts (see the careers time-line in the first web-site I have mentioned).
In 2002, a chemical engineer called John B. Fenn won (with 2 other researchers) the Nobel prize in chemistry for the development of methods for identification and structure analyses of biological macromolecules. You can view more details of his discovery at http://nobelprize.org/chemistry/laureates/2002/index.html

It's great to hear from someone considering studying chemical engineering though, as, unfortunately, it's not really a very well publicized career option. However, it's apparently a very rewarding career (helping provide much needed medicines, combating global warming and producing new products - from chocolate bars to chemicals) and with chemical engineering salaries for graduates starting in the region of £20,000-£30,000 it is also financially rewarding (So it rivals that of medicine and dentistry without having to study for 5 or 6 years and then complete further training that you would have to complete to work in these areas).

As for chemical engineering at Strathclyde, I defiantly recommend going to the open-day in September and speaking to the staff who can answer degree related questions. They'll probably ask you to leave your address with them and then they will invite you to a department open-day or send you further information. The department open-day is great as it is usually carried out during term-time for university students and so it will give you a chance to ask the students their opinion of the course and allow you to see the department working.

Anyway, I hope that hasn't been overwhelming and you've found it helpful. If you have anything else you want to ask then feel free to do so - I'd be happy to help.

P.S. A couple of websites worth looking up are;

www.whynotchemeng.com (A general website about the subject)
www.icheme.org.uk (The website for the UK institute of chemical engineers)



#51702 AH Chemistry Investigation

Posted by Bridget on 26 August 2005 - 03:51 PM in Chemistry

You'll need to be careful when investigating asprin as it is one of the PPAs which appear in unit 3 - so make sure you're investigation isn't too similar.
As for getting more info. for your project, I'd check out the royal society of chemistry's web-site at www.rsc.org. I found it really useful when doing my investigation - hope it helps. smile.gif



#50964 Chemical Engineering-Strathclyde

Posted by Bridget on 22 August 2005 - 09:51 PM in Course Choices

Me? I'm not going to Strathclyde, but I know 2 people who are. I went to a couple of the open days at Strathclyde, but in the end I was thinking more about going straight into 2nd year and very few people take that option there. But the course at Strathclyde did seem REALLY interesting and had great links with major companies (Exxon Mobil - to name one).
Plus, I forgot to mention, for those of you who have great academic records, there is loads of funding/ scholarships out there (especially if your a girl).



#50905 Chemical Engineering-Strathclyde

Posted by Bridget on 22 August 2005 - 08:42 PM in Course Choices

Hi, I'm just starting a degree in chemical engineering.
The course is mainly a combination of maths, chemistry and physics - although more recently it involves concepts found in biology and medicine (i.e. biotechnology, designing artificial organs/ skin cells/ etc).
It's actually quite a broad degree at university in terms of what you will study. Most chemical engineering students, on top of a heavily scientific/engineering course content, must also takes courses in management, computing, economics, possibly European law/ social policy etc. which are essential for roles within the chemical industry (this is because chemical engineers frequently reach management positions). Infact, in some universities, languages can also be taken which provide the chance to spend 6 months or a year abroad, carrying out research or studying at a non-English speaking university.
There are two different classifications of degree offered to chemical engineering students, the BEng and the MEng. The Meng will immediately allow you to enter into a graduate industrial position where as the Beng will only allow you to qualify once you have completed a further course via an industrial placement. If you are doing a master of engineering as an undergraduate degree, you will have to complete a research project in your 5th year (either in an industrial or university environment) Direct entry (going directly into 2nd year) to either of these degrees is usually offered by most universities providing you gain ~AAB in appropriate AHs.
The average age of becoming a chartered chemical engineer is 27, and this will allow you to apply for more senior positions and gain a considerable rise in your salary. Not only will a degree in chemical engineering allow you to become a chemical engineer, but also (because of its mathematical content) it will allow you to work in investment banking, accounting, finance, etc and if further training is taking, patent law, business. I’ve heard of some chemical engineers pursuing a career in medicine after gaining a degree in the subject. On a stranger note, a few chemical engineers have become astronauts (see the careers time-line in the first web-site I have mentioned).

It's great to hear from someone considering studying chemical engineering though, as, unfortunately, it's not really a very well publicised career option. However, it's apparently a very rewarding career (helping provide much needed medicines, combating global warming and producing new products - from chocolate bars to chemicals) and with chemical engineering salaries for graduates starting in the region of £20,000-£30,000 it is also financially rewarding (So it rivals that of medicine and dentistry without having to study for 5 or 6 years and then complete further training that you would have to complete to work in these areas).

Anyway, I hope that hasn't been overwhelming and you've found it helpful. If you have anything else you want to ask then feel free to do so - I'd be happy to help.

P.S. A couple of websites worth looking up are;

www.whynotchemeng.com (A general website about the subject)
www.icheme.org.uk (The website for the UK institute of chemical engineers)