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#1 JAZZA007

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Posted 20 December 2008 - 01:48 PM

did any one else find p&n 2008/2009 Plato not Prozac close Reading hard but managed to scrape a 25 out of 50 marks for it. rolleyes.gif

#2 JAZZA007

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Posted 21 December 2008 - 04:12 PM

QUOTE (JAZZA007 @ Dec 20 2008, 01:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
did any one else find p&n 2008/2009 Plato not Prozac close Reading hard but managed to scrape a 25 out of 50 marks for it. rolleyes.gif


Yeh i did that one as a practice prelim and found it really hard

#3 JAZZA007

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Posted 30 January 2009 - 03:44 PM

QUOTE (JAZZA007 @ Dec 20 2008, 01:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
did any one else find p&n 2008/2009 Plato not Prozac close Reading hard but managed to scrape a 25 out of 50 marks for it. rolleyes.gif



Did anybody do Plato Not Prozac for thier prelim this year, I would be curious to know how people got on as I found it too difficult and I'm in 6th year having done int 2 last year smile.gif

#4 gilmour57

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Posted 31 January 2009 - 10:04 PM

QUOTE (JAZZA007 @ Jan 30 2009, 03:44 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (JAZZA007 @ Dec 20 2008, 01:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
did any one else find p&n 2008/2009 Plato not Prozac close Reading hard but managed to scrape a 25 out of 50 marks for it. rolleyes.gif



Did anybody do Plato Not Prozac for thier prelim this year, I would be curious to know how people got on as I found it too difficult and I'm in 6th year having done int 2 last year smile.gif



Look I am new to this site and was just wondering about this famous prelim paper on Plato not prozac I heard that it is of extreme difficulty and was wondering if you are able to send me a copy????? It would be so good if you could. wb asap smile.gif

#5 JAZZA007

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Posted 01 February 2009 - 10:19 AM

QUOTE (gilmour57 @ Jan 31 2009, 10:04 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (JAZZA007 @ Jan 30 2009, 03:44 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (JAZZA007 @ Dec 20 2008, 01:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
did any one else find p&n 2008/2009 Plato not Prozac close Reading hard but managed to scrape a 25 out of 50 marks for it. rolleyes.gif



Did anybody do Plato Not Prozac for thier prelim this year, I would be curious to know how people got on as I found it too difficult and I'm in 6th year having done int 2 last year smile.gif



Look I am new to this site and was just wondering about this famous prelim paper on Plato not prozac I heard that it is of extreme difficulty and was wondering if you are able to send me a copy????? It would be so good if you could. wb asap smile.gif


Sorry I can't I did it for my prelim so it has to remain unseen rolleyes.gif

#6 gilmour57

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Posted 01 February 2009 - 07:21 PM

QUOTE (JAZZA007 @ Feb 1 2009, 10:19 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (gilmour57 @ Jan 31 2009, 10:04 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (JAZZA007 @ Jan 30 2009, 03:44 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (JAZZA007 @ Dec 20 2008, 01:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
did any one else find p&n 2008/2009 Plato not Prozac close Reading hard but managed to scrape a 25 out of 50 marks for it. rolleyes.gif



Did anybody do Plato Not Prozac for thier prelim this year, I would be curious to know how people got on as I found it too difficult and I'm in 6th year having done int 2 last year smile.gif



Look I am new to this site and was just wondering about this famous prelim paper on Plato not prozac I heard that it is of extreme difficulty and was wondering if you are able to send me a copy????? It would be so good if you could. wb asap smile.gif


Sorry I can't I did it for my prelim so it has to remain unseen rolleyes.gif



Do you have it?

wb

#7 Nick1

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Posted 02 February 2009 - 01:05 AM

QUOTE (JAZZA007 @ Dec 20 2008, 01:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
did any one else find p&n 2008/2009 Plato not Prozac close Reading hard but managed to scrape a 25 out of 50 marks for it. :rolleyes:


Read your comment with interest. Sorry to hear that you found it so difficult. When I did Higher English, our class had to read a variety of articles for non-fiction prose on "Plato not Prozac." I ended up writing a critical essay on one from "The Scotsman", which was extremely challenging. Our English teacher was crazy and made us read things on moral philosophy! Out of curiosity was it any of these?

How can I fill this void in my life?
Observer - I shrink, therefore I am
Times - Prozac for eight-year-olds?
Times Higher Education - I have a good mind to help

Good luck with your Higher English. Hope the real thing is not so difficult.


#8 JAZZA007

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Posted 02 February 2009 - 12:49 PM

QUOTE (Nick1 @ Feb 2 2009, 01:05 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (JAZZA007 @ Dec 20 2008, 01:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
did any one else find p&n 2008/2009 Plato not Prozac close Reading hard but managed to scrape a 25 out of 50 marks for it. rolleyes.gif


Read your comment with interest. Sorry to hear that you found it so difficult. When I did Higher English, our class had to read a variety of articles for non-fiction prose on "Plato not Prozac." I ended up writing a critical essay on one from "The Scotsman", which was extremely challenging. Our English teacher was crazy and made us read things on moral philosophy! Out of curiosity was it any of these?

How can I fill this void in my life?
Observer - I shrink, therefore I am
Times - Prozac for eight-year-olds?
Times Higher Education - I have a good mind to help

Good luck with your Higher English. Hope the real thing is not so difficult.


It was none of those as it was P&N but very interesting articles. Could you possibly help me with Catcher in the Rye and/or A View From the Bridge, any help greatly appreciated. LOL wink.gif

#9 Nick1

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 10:51 PM

QUOTE (JAZZA007 @ Feb 2 2009, 12:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Nick1 @ Feb 2 2009, 01:05 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (JAZZA007 @ Dec 20 2008, 01:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
did any one else find p&n 2008/2009 Plato not Prozac close Reading hard but managed to scrape a 25 out of 50 marks for it. rolleyes.gif


Read your comment with interest. Sorry to hear that you found it so difficult. When I did Higher English, our class had to read a variety of articles for non-fiction prose on "Plato not Prozac." I ended up writing a critical essay on one from "The Scotsman", which was extremely challenging. Our English teacher was crazy and made us read things on moral philosophy! Out of curiosity was it any of these?

How can I fill this void in my life?
Observer - I shrink, therefore I am
Times - Prozac for eight-year-olds?
Times Higher Education - I have a good mind to help

Good luck with your Higher English. Hope the real thing is not so difficult.


It was none of those as it was P&N but very interesting articles. Could you possibly help me with Catcher in the Rye and/or A View From the Bridge, any help greatly appreciated. LOL wink.gif


A friend had a copy of this book review. Hope it is of some help to you. It might be a bit dodgy in places, due to scanning and running OCR on it.
My brother did "A View From The Bridge" for his Higher English but I don't think he still has his notes for it.

Book Review On ‘The Catcher in the rye’ (J.D. Salinger)
“A study of the various factors which cause Holden Caulfield to be on the verge of a nervous breakdown, in J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye.”

Having read J.D. Salinger’s book ‘The Catcher in the Rye’ on several occasions, it is easy to assume I enjoy the book. That is very true, partly because each time I read it I take something new from it, such as a new theme I have learnt or something more that 1 can relate to. I thoroughly enjoyed Salinger’ s concentration on the main character Holden Caulfield. He uses him to narrate the story and the events that happened to him in a past tense based on a few months earlier, whilst we can assume he is in a psychiatric hospital or home of some sort in the present. I found it fascinating to read his own thoughts on what he had been through and his views on people, which he provides vividly and often very critically. It was easy for me to identify with Holden from my own experiences, as he struggles to deal with the transition into becoming an adult in a world where he believes most of the adults are ‘phonies’ and their childlike innocence is lost. This conflict I’ve mentioned, between interacting as an adult or retreating from various people as a child is based on Holden’s fears and anxieties. These are the climax of experiences that he has endured including the death three years earlier of his brother Allie from leukemia when Holden was thirteen. The suicide of one of his schoolmates James Castle, at Elkton Hills — one of the four schools he is thrown out of for failing classes is another event. In an attempt to tackle the outlined study above, I will elaborate and analyse several events that Holden provides commentary on in the forthcoming paragraphs.

Throughout the novel it become increasingly clear that Holden wished to resist the process of change that is evident in becoming an adult. He craves isolation to protect himself, as he believes deep meaningful interaction will change him and he fears change immensely. The question isn’t whether this is true or not, it is why, he arrived at this state of consciousness. This isolation I mentioned which is very cynical on his part, evident in his recollections o his date with Sally Hayes for instance, where he insults heist to drive her away to protect himself, I believe stems from his brother’s death. As a result of emotional effect it has, Holden uses the metaphor of himself standing on a cliff unable to completely fall off into the realm of adulthood, dreaming of the connection he envisions adults having, but his anxieties prevent him from realising, thus eventually leading to his breakdown.

In the initial chapters it is learnt Holden has been forbidden to return to school after failing four of the five subjects he took. Furthermore, he meets with his former history teacher who then lectures him on his failings “Life is a game, boy. Life is a game that one plays according to the rules” (,p7). From this quote, the deeper message that is conveyed to the reader is that Holden is refusing to apply himself, as it apparent from the outset that he an intelligent boy. This implied straight away that something was preventing Holden from moving on and maturing into an adult, possibly sub consciously. Furthermore, in this event in the book, Holden’s cynicism towards adults and unwillingness to take advice and feelings of alienation is apparent, which reinforces an idea that Holden uses a barrier to prevent any connections being made with people.

It is in chapter 5, when Salinger explores Holden’s memories of his dead brother Allie. This is a very significant moment with regards to the outlined study above. Holden has agreed to write a composition for Allie on something descriptive like a room or a house. Holden couldn’t think of anything to describe either so choose to write about Allie’s baseball mitt in a very descriptive manner in addition to providing an insight into his thoughts on Allie “He was also the nicest, in lots of ways. He never got mad at anybody” (p33). In this chapter, it also becomes apparent of the affect that Allie’s death had on Holden, although the lasting implications are not yet developed upon. “I was only thirteen, and they were going to have me psychoanalysed and all, because I broke all the windows in the garage.” “I slept in the garage the night he died, and I broke all the windows with my fist, just for the hell of it. I even tried to break all the windows on the station wagon we had that summer, but my hand was already broken and everything by that time, and I couldn’t do it” Later in Holden’s narration its s evident how undecided he is on the traumatic implications of this event, In reference to writing the composition, on ‘one hand he states “I wasn’t too crazy about doing it”, on the other hand “1 sort of liked doing it” (p34). The fact that Holden doesn’t express his emotional feelings on the death, clearly would suggest a reason why he is so cynical, and against becoming an adult. This furthermore implied that this one singular event was a major part in why we suspect a nervous breakdown was evident at the end of his) collections.

Later in the story when Stradlater criticizes the composition, in addition to taunting Holden about a girl he clearly feels strongly for, Holden snaps and attempts to hit his roommate. This eventually leads to Holden prematurely leaving Pency. The deeper meaning conveyed in the actions is clearly to reinforce how personal Allie is to Holden, in addition to exploring the thought that Jane Gallacher was also significant to Holden’s Past. The fact that Holden knew Stradlater went out on a date with her and was ab6y with sexual experience tormented him deeply, suggesting that Holden wished for aspects of adult life (like sex) but his fears prevented him.

Symbolism and metaphors are used throughout the book, and in chapter 9 this is evident when he questions a taxi driver on where the ducks in the central park lagoon go in the winter when the pond freezes over. As I mentioned earlier, Holden has clearly been effected traumatically by his brother’s death, and on some level this has made him aware on how fragile life is, thus scared of change and becoming an adult. The symbolism evident is in the ducks returning in spring, hence showing Holden a change that isn’t permanent — which is exactly what terrifies him. Furthermore the metaphor here is within the pond, in the winter and spring, frozen and not frozen, a transition between the two extents, just like the cliff that Holden sees himself standing on between being a child and becoming an adult. Again this reinforces the idea that Allies death played a major role Holden’s outlook thereafter, and as a consequence provided barriers to isolate himself in an attempt prolong his childhood and resist the progression into the adult world Holden sees as cruel.

Mid way through the book it is clear Holden is very lonely, and strives for interaction. He tries to call a girl he doesn’t even know called Faith Cavendish in the middle of the night, which clearly influences the reader’s line of thinking Holden’s mental state isn’t quite right. He is constantly thinking of other people, including his sister and Jane Gallacher once again. Through his reminiscing of Jane Gallacher, it is evident he was very happy when he was with her and he felt they had a connection. Part of the reason for this could be that he felt she could relate to the way he felt after his brother’s death, with regards to her stepfather and how he made her feel. Furthermore, from this section in the book when Jane starts to cry after her stepfather asked about cigarettes, there is a deeper message which Holden grasps “If Mr Cudahy-that was the booze hound’s name-had ever tried to get wise with her” (p71). This offers a reason why Holden found the adult world ugly, again reflecting on bad things happening to nice innocent children (like Allie), in addition to why she is dear to his thoughts. The connection he has with her is plain to see but the fact that he mentions phoning her on numerous occasions, yet never speaks shows his fear of rejection and need to retreat into his childlike world. This consequently deepens Holden’s loneliness.

Two incidents which occur later again show this need for connection to help him through this difficult period in his life, with regards to his encounter with a prostitute Sunny and his date with Sally Hayes. Both act as opportunities to deal with his fears of reality — dealing with something he wants and believes he needs (sex) to become an adult, yet fears because everything he holds dear is innocent and pure as opposed to his cynical views on an evil and superficial adult world. On the other side of this conflict, Allie, his sister Phoebe, and Jane clearly present this childlike quality. In the incident with Sunny he is too scared to have sex and again retracts ‘back to his isolation, which consequently only brings him closer to his eventual breakdown implied. Before Holden’s date with Sally, he visits the museum of natural history. It is evident on the visit that Holden clearly doesn’t want to deal with the responsibilities of becoming an adult “The best thing, though, in that museum was that everything stayed right where it was” (p109). This clearly symbolizes his unwillingness to change a retreat to the safety of being a child. This is furthermore reinforced by Holden’s acceptance of how he is troubled by how he has changed every time that he returns to the museum, clearly implying he wished he could live in a museum like world, where things never change, and death’s like Allie’s don’t take place.

The date with Sally Hayes climaxes when Holden, who clearly shows imminent signs of a breakdown’ by choosing to ignore the acceptance that he is shouting at her, and reiterating that he was “depressed as hell again”(pl19), asks Sally to run away with him. This is before being rejected and proceeding to call her “Royal pain in the ass” (p 120), thus making her cry. He had claimed he loved her, but after her refusal, 1-lolden clearly shows he can’t deal with conflict, and again retreats into isolation (protecting himself), even although he desperately needs the connection. These attempted connections, are followed by similar instances with Carl Luce, and two women at the bar. There is again reference to how important Allie was to Holden in chapter

20 where he is upset by the memory of leaving flowers on Allie’s grave and stopped visiting, clearly suggesting the visits troubled him emotionally.
The later chapters only prove to further strengthen Allie’s importance in Holden’s eventual implied breakdown. This is in addition to the tragic death of James Castle who committed suicide after being tormented by other boys at their school. This memory flashes back to him when his sister asks him to tell her something he likes and all he can say is “I like Allie”(p154). His emotions are obviously affected by the memories of both James and his brother as he bursts into tears when Phoebe gives him her Christmas money. Later in this incident, Holden again showed through his narration, his fear of adulthood with his theory on saving children from falling off the symbolic cliff “And I’m standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff’ (p156).

Holden’s final opportunity to make a connection as an adult comes with his meeting with Mr Antolini. This ends negatively when Holden’s cynicism makes him view Mr Antolini’s patting him on his head as he slept as a homosexual approach, which completely destroys any chance Holden has of surviving the fall that Mr Antolini suggests he will have. Again, this provides reinforcement for Holden’s need for protection from the adult world, thus making his loneliness stronger.
In the second last chapter, Allie’s importance is again seen. His behaviour suggests a breakdown is very imminent and unavoidable, when he walks up and down Fifth Avenue. When Holden crosses a street his anxiety makes him feel like he will disappear. He seeks his dead brother’s aid to help him make the other side. This clearly shows the culmination of Allies death’s effect on Holden.

In summary, I hope I have been able to provide an analysis in the contributing factors, with special reference to Allie’s death and the effect it has on Holden. As a result he perceives the adult world to be an ugly place he fears, and dreams of staying in the safe solitude (pond, museum) of an innocent child’s world. This consequently affects his behaviour and need for isolation, which only enhances his depression. Furthermore, the death of James only proves to heighten Holden’s resolve that the adult world is a scary place that takes and corrupts nice people like his brother Allie.



#10 JAZZA007

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 12:24 PM

QUOTE (Nick1 @ Feb 5 2009, 10:51 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (JAZZA007 @ Feb 2 2009, 12:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (Nick1 @ Feb 2 2009, 01:05 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
QUOTE (JAZZA007 @ Dec 20 2008, 01:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
did any one else find p&n 2008/2009 Plato not Prozac close Reading hard but managed to scrape a 25 out of 50 marks for it. rolleyes.gif


Read your comment with interest. Sorry to hear that you found it so difficult. When I did Higher English, our class had to read a variety of articles for non-fiction prose on "Plato not Prozac." I ended up writing a critical essay on one from "The Scotsman", which was extremely challenging. Our English teacher was crazy and made us read things on moral philosophy! Out of curiosity was it any of these?

How can I fill this void in my life?
Observer - I shrink, therefore I am
Times - Prozac for eight-year-olds?
Times Higher Education - I have a good mind to help

Good luck with your Higher English. Hope the real thing is not so difficult.


It was none of those as it was P&N but very interesting articles. Could you possibly help me with Catcher in the Rye and/or A View From the Bridge, any help greatly appreciated. LOL wink.gif


A friend had a copy of this book review. Hope it is of some help to you. It might be a bit dodgy in places, due to scanning and running OCR on it.
My brother did "A View From The Bridge" for his Higher English but I don't think he still has his notes for it.

Book Review On ‘The Catcher in the rye’ (J.D. Salinger)
“A study of the various factors which cause Holden Caulfield to be on the verge of a nervous breakdown, in J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye.”

Having read J.D. Salinger’s book ‘The Catcher in the Rye’ on several occasions, it is easy to assume I enjoy the book. That is very true, partly because each time I read it I take something new from it, such as a new theme I have learnt or something more that 1 can relate to. I thoroughly enjoyed Salinger’ s concentration on the main character Holden Caulfield. He uses him to narrate the story and the events that happened to him in a past tense based on a few months earlier, whilst we can assume he is in a psychiatric hospital or home of some sort in the present. I found it fascinating to read his own thoughts on what he had been through and his views on people, which he provides vividly and often very critically. It was easy for me to identify with Holden from my own experiences, as he struggles to deal with the transition into becoming an adult in a world where he believes most of the adults are ‘phonies’ and their childlike innocence is lost. This conflict I’ve mentioned, between interacting as an adult or retreating from various people as a child is based on Holden’s fears and anxieties. These are the climax of experiences that he has endured including the death three years earlier of his brother Allie from leukemia when Holden was thirteen. The suicide of one of his schoolmates James Castle, at Elkton Hills — one of the four schools he is thrown out of for failing classes is another event. In an attempt to tackle the outlined study above, I will elaborate and analyse several events that Holden provides commentary on in the forthcoming paragraphs.

Throughout the novel it become increasingly clear that Holden wished to resist the process of change that is evident in becoming an adult. He craves isolation to protect himself, as he believes deep meaningful interaction will change him and he fears change immensely. The question isn’t whether this is true or not, it is why, he arrived at this state of consciousness. This isolation I mentioned which is very cynical on his part, evident in his recollections o his date with Sally Hayes for instance, where he insults heist to drive her away to protect himself, I believe stems from his brother’s death. As a result of emotional effect it has, Holden uses the metaphor of himself standing on a cliff unable to completely fall off into the realm of adulthood, dreaming of the connection he envisions adults having, but his anxieties prevent him from realising, thus eventually leading to his breakdown.

In the initial chapters it is learnt Holden has been forbidden to return to school after failing four of the five subjects he took. Furthermore, he meets with his former history teacher who then lectures him on his failings “Life is a game, boy. Life is a game that one plays according to the rules” (,p7). From this quote, the deeper message that is conveyed to the reader is that Holden is refusing to apply himself, as it apparent from the outset that he an intelligent boy. This implied straight away that something was preventing Holden from moving on and maturing into an adult, possibly sub consciously. Furthermore, in this event in the book, Holden’s cynicism towards adults and unwillingness to take advice and feelings of alienation is apparent, which reinforces an idea that Holden uses a barrier to prevent any connections being made with people.

It is in chapter 5, when Salinger explores Holden’s memories of his dead brother Allie. This is a very significant moment with regards to the outlined study above. Holden has agreed to write a composition for Allie on something descriptive like a room or a house. Holden couldn’t think of anything to describe either so choose to write about Allie’s baseball mitt in a very descriptive manner in addition to providing an insight into his thoughts on Allie “He was also the nicest, in lots of ways. He never got mad at anybody” (p33). In this chapter, it also becomes apparent of the affect that Allie’s death had on Holden, although the lasting implications are not yet developed upon. “I was only thirteen, and they were going to have me psychoanalysed and all, because I broke all the windows in the garage.” “I slept in the garage the night he died, and I broke all the windows with my fist, just for the hell of it. I even tried to break all the windows on the station wagon we had that summer, but my hand was already broken and everything by that time, and I couldn’t do it” Later in Holden’s narration its s evident how undecided he is on the traumatic implications of this event, In reference to writing the composition, on ‘one hand he states “I wasn’t too crazy about doing it”, on the other hand “1 sort of liked doing it” (p34). The fact that Holden doesn’t express his emotional feelings on the death, clearly would suggest a reason why he is so cynical, and against becoming an adult. This furthermore implied that this one singular event was a major part in why we suspect a nervous breakdown was evident at the end of his) collections.

Later in the story when Stradlater criticizes the composition, in addition to taunting Holden about a girl he clearly feels strongly for, Holden snaps and attempts to hit his roommate. This eventually leads to Holden prematurely leaving Pency. The deeper meaning conveyed in the actions is clearly to reinforce how personal Allie is to Holden, in addition to exploring the thought that Jane Gallacher was also significant to Holden’s Past. The fact that Holden knew Stradlater went out on a date with her and was ab6y with sexual experience tormented him deeply, suggesting that Holden wished for aspects of adult life (like sex) but his fears prevented him.

Symbolism and metaphors are used throughout the book, and in chapter 9 this is evident when he questions a taxi driver on where the ducks in the central park lagoon go in the winter when the pond freezes over. As I mentioned earlier, Holden has clearly been effected traumatically by his brother’s death, and on some level this has made him aware on how fragile life is, thus scared of change and becoming an adult. The symbolism evident is in the ducks returning in spring, hence showing Holden a change that isn’t permanent — which is exactly what terrifies him. Furthermore the metaphor here is within the pond, in the winter and spring, frozen and not frozen, a transition between the two extents, just like the cliff that Holden sees himself standing on between being a child and becoming an adult. Again this reinforces the idea that Allies death played a major role Holden’s outlook thereafter, and as a consequence provided barriers to isolate himself in an attempt prolong his childhood and resist the progression into the adult world Holden sees as cruel.

Mid way through the book it is clear Holden is very lonely, and strives for interaction. He tries to call a girl he doesn’t even know called Faith Cavendish in the middle of the night, which clearly influences the reader’s line of thinking Holden’s mental state isn’t quite right. He is constantly thinking of other people, including his sister and Jane Gallacher once again. Through his reminiscing of Jane Gallacher, it is evident he was very happy when he was with her and he felt they had a connection. Part of the reason for this could be that he felt she could relate to the way he felt after his brother’s death, with regards to her stepfather and how he made her feel. Furthermore, from this section in the book when Jane starts to cry after her stepfather asked about cigarettes, there is a deeper message which Holden grasps “If Mr Cudahy-that was the booze hound’s name-had ever tried to get wise with her” (p71). This offers a reason why Holden found the adult world ugly, again reflecting on bad things happening to nice innocent children (like Allie), in addition to why she is dear to his thoughts. The connection he has with her is plain to see but the fact that he mentions phoning her on numerous occasions, yet never speaks shows his fear of rejection and need to retreat into his childlike world. This consequently deepens Holden’s loneliness.

Two incidents which occur later again show this need for connection to help him through this difficult period in his life, with regards to his encounter with a prostitute Sunny and his date with Sally Hayes. Both act as opportunities to deal with his fears of reality — dealing with something he wants and believes he needs (sex) to become an adult, yet fears because everything he holds dear is innocent and pure as opposed to his cynical views on an evil and superficial adult world. On the other side of this conflict, Allie, his sister Phoebe, and Jane clearly present this childlike quality. In the incident with Sunny he is too scared to have sex and again retracts ‘back to his isolation, which consequently only brings him closer to his eventual breakdown implied. Before Holden’s date with Sally, he visits the museum of natural history. It is evident on the visit that Holden clearly doesn’t want to deal with the responsibilities of becoming an adult “The best thing, though, in that museum was that everything stayed right where it was” (p109). This clearly symbolizes his unwillingness to change a retreat to the safety of being a child. This is furthermore reinforced by Holden’s acceptance of how he is troubled by how he has changed every time that he returns to the museum, clearly implying he wished he could live in a museum like world, where things never change, and death’s like Allie’s don’t take place.

The date with Sally Hayes climaxes when Holden, who clearly shows imminent signs of a breakdown’ by choosing to ignore the acceptance that he is shouting at her, and reiterating that he was “depressed as hell again”(pl19), asks Sally to run away with him. This is before being rejected and proceeding to call her “Royal pain in the ass” (p 120), thus making her cry. He had claimed he loved her, but after her refusal, 1-lolden clearly shows he can’t deal with conflict, and again retreats into isolation (protecting himself), even although he desperately needs the connection. These attempted connections, are followed by similar instances with Carl Luce, and two women at the bar. There is again reference to how important Allie was to Holden in chapter

20 where he is upset by the memory of leaving flowers on Allie’s grave and stopped visiting, clearly suggesting the visits troubled him emotionally.
The later chapters only prove to further strengthen Allie’s importance in Holden’s eventual implied breakdown. This is in addition to the tragic death of James Castle who committed suicide after being tormented by other boys at their school. This memory flashes back to him when his sister asks him to tell her something he likes and all he can say is “I like Allie”(p154). His emotions are obviously affected by the memories of both James and his brother as he bursts into tears when Phoebe gives him her Christmas money. Later in this incident, Holden again showed through his narration, his fear of adulthood with his theory on saving children from falling off the symbolic cliff “And I’m standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff’ (p156).

Holden’s final opportunity to make a connection as an adult comes with his meeting with Mr Antolini. This ends negatively when Holden’s cynicism makes him view Mr Antolini’s patting him on his head as he slept as a homosexual approach, which completely destroys any chance Holden has of surviving the fall that Mr Antolini suggests he will have. Again, this provides reinforcement for Holden’s need for protection from the adult world, thus making his loneliness stronger.
In the second last chapter, Allie’s importance is again seen. His behaviour suggests a breakdown is very imminent and unavoidable, when he walks up and down Fifth Avenue. When Holden crosses a street his anxiety makes him feel like he will disappear. He seeks his dead brother’s aid to help him make the other side. This clearly shows the culmination of Allies death’s effect on Holden.

In summary, I hope I have been able to provide an analysis in the contributing factors, with special reference to Allie’s death and the effect it has on Holden. As a result he perceives the adult world to be an ugly place he fears, and dreams of staying in the safe solitude (pond, museum) of an innocent child’s world. This consequently affects his behaviour and need for isolation, which only enhances his depression. Furthermore, the death of James only proves to heighten Holden’s resolve that the adult world is a scary place that takes and corrupts nice people like his brother Allie.



Thank You SO MUCH laugh.gif smile.gif greatly needed and appreciated


#11 Sheraz

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 07:57 PM

QUOTE (JAZZA007 @ Dec 20 2008, 01:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
did any one else find p&n 2008/2009 Plato not Prozac close Reading hard but managed to scrape a 25 out of 50 marks for it. rolleyes.gif


AYE it was alright, not that hard. The questions were easy.

#12 Pod~Tastic

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 04:05 PM

QUOTE (JAZZA007 @ Dec 20 2008, 02:48 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
did any one else find p&n 2008/2009 Plato not Prozac close Reading hard but managed to scrape a 25 out of 50 marks for it. rolleyes.gif


we done that in our prelim it was a complete nightmare! i got 34/50 for my essays which i was chuffed but only managed to get 16.5 / 50 for that plato not prozac paper! pulled my grade right down sad.gif
.. follow your instincts, that's where true wisdom manifests itself

#13 JAZZA007

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Posted 20 May 2010 - 03:28 PM

In the end for the 2009 exam I got a grade A and I am now finishing 1st year at Uni of Aberdeen :rolleyes: :)
Close Reading : 37
> Critical Essay : 42
>





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